Behold the beauty of sri lanka

Wildlife......

                                              YALA NATIONAL PARK,   Yala National Park is situated in the kingdom of Ruhuna which had an advanced civilization by evidence of the remains of dagabas and reservoirs built to irrigate large extents of cultivable land.

        Being located in one of the dry regions of Sri Lanka, the climate of the National Park is usually hot and dry. The area receives its annual rainfall during the north east monsoon from November to January, and unpredictable inter-monsoonal rains in March/April and September.  In 1938, Yala Game Sanctuary was declared as a National Park, only with block I and other blocks were included later. it Varies from open parkland to dense jungle on the plains. The scrub land is particularly distinctive with its enormous rocky outcrops, or inselbergs. There are also several streams, small lakes & brackish lagoons. The ocean to the east has wide beaches & high sand dunes. The varied terrain supports an extraordinary range of wildlife & vegetation.

          The park's dry-zone landscape is strikingly beautiful, especially when viewed from the vantage points offered by the curious rock outcrops which dot the park. From these you can look out over a seemingly endless expanse of low scrub & trees dotted with lakes next to the dune - covered coast line, particularly magical from Situlpahuwa monastic settlement at Yala's northern end. In the southeast, the Park is bounded by the sea. Unspoilt natural beaches and sand dunes provide a beautiful environment. This is surely one of the most spectacular seascapes of Sri Lanka. Far out at sea are two lighthouses which are named as the great and little basses. The extensive parklands that surround the lagoons offer visitors superb locations for viewing animals and bird life....

         The best period to see the animals is during the January to May dry season, when animals cluster around water sources in multi-species groups. Dawn & dusk are the best times of day to witness animals......

Wildlife......

 

UDAWALAWE NATIONAL PARK,   Uda Walwe National Park, is the best place in Asia to see herds of Asian Elephants in the wild. Uda Walawe National Park, is one of Sri Lanka's Dry-Zone Dry Evergreen Forests that harbors one of Asia'a largest & most viable Asian elephant populations. The 30,821ha Park was set up in the year 1972 to protect the catchments area of the man-made Rainwater Reservoir which is at the south end of the River Walwe. The vital habitats that make up this land area include open parkland, grassland and thorn scrub aside riverbanks that are home to many valuable and much sought-after species of trees. Udawalawe was declared a national park in 1972.Since then it has become very popular, especially with Foreigners.

        The Udawalawe reservoir is named after the Walawe Ganga, the river that feeds it. This reservoir was created as part of the massive Mahaweli development scheme and irrigates some 25,000 hectares of land south of the dam, which is 4 kilometres long. The park has the dual purpose of protecting the catchment area of the reservoir and providing a refuge for wildlife - particularly elephants - displaced by the opening up of land for agriculture in the region...

Wildlife......

 

KUMANA,  A well-known bird sanctuary where a multitude of birds breed and roost. One of the most significant features of the park is the ‘Kumana Villu’ - a 200 hectare natural swamp lake, fed by the ‘Kumbukkan Oya’ through a half mile long narrow channel. The 18,149 hectare Sanctuary Situated on the southeast coast of the island in the Eastern Province is Less well known than its sister, Yala West (Ruhuna) National Park, it is an exciting and diverse place to visit for its main attraction, the Kumana wewa, fed by the Kumbukkan Oya, and its surrounding mangroves that provide an important habitat for many aquatic birds. It is been well known as one of the bird Sanctuaries that attracts the largest number of migratory bird and aquatic birds.....